How to collect allium seeds

How to collect allium seeds

We show you how to collect and store allium seeds from the garden.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
To do
To do

Do not To do in January

Do not To do in February

Do not To do in March

Do not To do in April

Do not To do in May

Do not To do in June

Do not To do in July

Do not To do in August

Do To do in September

Do To do in October

Do not To do in November

Do not To do in December

Alliums are spectacular plants, so it’s worth saving a few seeds to sow in spring to grow more for the garden.

Seeds from cultivars won’t be true to type, but it’s fun to grow them anyway and see what you get. The seeds will germinate quickly and reach flowering size in a couple of years. When planting out, choose a sheltered, sunny spot with sharp drainage to get the best display.

If you want to keep the seedheads in the garden for winter interest, try tapping the seeds directly into a paper bag. You could also re-use the cut seedheads in indoor displays.

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Find out how to collect and store allium seeds in three easy steps.

Seeds from cultivars won't be true to type, but it's fun to grow them anyway and see what you get.
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You Will Need

  • Secateurs
  • Paper bag or envelope

Total time:

Step 1

Cut the seedheads from your allium plants as they start to break open.

Allium seedhead revealing the exposed seeds
Allium seedhead revealing the exposed seeds

Step 2

Bring them indoors and let them dry out.

Drying out allium seedheads
Drying out allium seedheads

Step 3

Gently tap out the seeds and store them in labelled paper envelopes.

Allium seeds in the hand
Allium seeds in the hand
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If the weather’s damp when you pick the seedheads from your alliums, they can be hung in a paper bag in the airing cupboard to dry out thoroughly before storing.

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