Summer pollinator pot

How to create a summer pot for pollinators

Serve up a feast for pollinators by creating this gorgeous summer pot.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
At its best
At its best

Plant is not at its best in January

Plant is not at its best in February

Plant is not at its best in March

Plant is not at its best in April

Plant is not at its best in May

Plant is not at its best in June

Plant is at its best in July

Plant is at its best in August

Plant is at its best in September

Plant is not at its best in October

Plant is not at its best in November

Plant is not at its best in December

To do
To do

Do not To do in January

Do not To do in February

Do To do in March

Do To do in April

Do To do in May

Do not To do in June

Do not To do in July

Do not To do in August

Do not To do in September

Do not To do in October

Do not To do in November

Do not To do in December

Butterflies on the wing in August, such as painted ladies and red admirals, are the second generation to fly this year.

They have grown from eggs laid in spring by adults recently emerged from hibernation, or by migrants from continental Europe or Africa. They now need to stock up on nectar before migrating south or entering hibernation. Give them a helping hand by creating this pot packed with colourful, nectar-rich blooms.

To ensure more butterflies flutter over to your garden, take a look at our 10 plants for butterflies.

Find out how to create a wildlife-friendly summer pot for pollinators, below.

You will need

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Step 1

Choose a pot at least 50cm in diameter and fill the pot two-thirds full of compost. Remove the plants from their pots and tease out the roots if tightly congested.

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Step 2

Arrange the plants evenly in the pot, with the tallest at the back. Fill in around the rootballs with compost, then firm down gently to a few centimetres below the rim.

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Step 3

Water the container well and top up with more compost if necessary. Ensure the pot remains moist but not waterlogged and deadhead blooms to keep them flowering.

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Worried about caterpillars? The caterpillars of many butterfly species that visit our gardens, actually feed on plants often thought of as weeds, including nettles and dock. Rather than cutting them all down, one of the best things you can do is leave certain areas of garden to their own devices, to allow these food plants to grow. Food plants include nettles, birdsfoot trefoil, thistles (Onopordum), buckthorn and garlic mustard.