An early crop of strawberries

How to get an early crop of strawberries

Find out how to get an early crop of strawberries with the help of this practical guide.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
At its best
At its best

Plant is not at its best in January

Plant is not at its best in February

Plant is not at its best in March

Plant is not at its best in April

Plant is at its best in May

Plant is at its best in June

Plant is not at its best in July

Plant is not at its best in August

Plant is not at its best in September

Plant is not at its best in October

Plant is not at its best in November

Plant is not at its best in December

To do
To do

Do not To do in January

Do not To do in February

Do To do in March

Do To do in April

Do not To do in May

Do not To do in June

Do not To do in July

Do not To do in August

Do not To do in September

Do not To do in October

Do not To do in November

Do not To do in December

Strawberries are one of the most eagerly anticipated crops of summer, and early varieties of strawberry usually start fruiting in June.

Find out how to grow strawberries with the help of our practical strawberry Grow Guide.

If you can’t wait that long, you can encourage strawberries to flower and fruit six weeks ahead of outdoor plants by potting some up and bringing them into a cool greenhouse or conservatory.

All you need to do is keep them well lit, ventilated and watered to prevent the plants becoming leggy – and then enjoy your early harvest.

Here’s how to get an early crop of strawberries in three simple steps.

You will need

  • 3 strawberry plants (pot-grown, or lifted from the garden)
  • Large pot or hanging basket
  • Multi-purpose compost
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Total time:

Step 1

Plant two or three strawberry plants in a hanging basket or large pot of multi-purpose compost. Keep them well watered and ventilate the greenhouse on hot days – this will encourage pollinating insects, too.

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Step 2

As strawberries develop, cut off any long runners that grow, as these will divert energy from the crop.

removing-long-runners-from-strawberry-plant-2

Step 3

Check pot-grown plants carefully as the fruit develops for signs of slug damage. And it’s worth netting greenhouse doors and vents to stop the birds stealing the fruit as it ripens.

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In very hot weather, it’s worth covering your strawberry plants under glass with a piece of horticultural fleece. This will stop the leaves, flowers and fruit becoming scorched.

Watering can