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How to grow gaillardia - Gaillardia 'Burgunder'

How to grow gaillardia

All you need to know about growing gaillardia, in our Grow Guide.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Sow
Sow

Do not Sow in January

Do not Sow in February

Do Sow in March

Do Sow in April

Do not Sow in May

Do not Sow in June

Do not Sow in July

Do not Sow in August

Do not Sow in September

Do not Sow in October

Do not Sow in November

Do not Sow in December

Plant
Plant

Do not Plant in January

Do not Plant in February

Do not Plant in March

Do not Plant in April

Do Plant in May

Do Plant in June

Do not Plant in July

Do not Plant in August

Do not Plant in September

Do not Plant in October

Do not Plant in November

Do not Plant in December

Flowers
Flowers

Plant does not flower in January

Plant does not flower in February

Plant does not flower in March

Plant does not flower in April

Plant does not flower in May

Plant does flower in June

Plant does flower in July

Plant does flower in August

Plant does flower in September

Plant does flower in October

Plant does not flower in November

Plant does not flower in December

Take cuttings
Take cuttings

Do not Take cuttings in January

Do Take cuttings in February

Do Take cuttings in March

Do not Take cuttings in April

Do not Take cuttings in May

Do not Take cuttings in June

Do not Take cuttings in July

Do not Take cuttings in August

Do not Take cuttings in September

Do not Take cuttings in October

Do not Take cuttings in November

Do not Take cuttings in December

Cut back
Cut back

Do not Cut back in January

Do not Cut back in February

Do not Cut back in March

Do not Cut back in April

Do not Cut back in May

Do not Cut back in June

Do not Cut back in July

Do not Cut back in August

Do not Cut back in September

Do Cut back in October

Do Cut back in November

Do not Cut back in December

At its best
At its best

Plant is not at its best in January

Plant is not at its best in February

Plant is not at its best in March

Plant is not at its best in April

Plant is not at its best in May

Plant is at its best in June

Plant is at its best in July

Plant is at its best in August

Plant is at its best in September

Plant is not at its best in October

Plant is not at its best in November

Plant is not at its best in December

  • Plant size

    75cm height

    60cm spread

Gaillardia is one of the showiest of all border plants, bearing huge, daisy-type flowers in vivid shades of yellow, red, and orange. Most gaillardias are hardy perennials but there are a few annual varieties. Single-flowered types are attractive to pollinators. Gaillardias flower their socks off from summer to autumn on stout stems up to 75cm high, above basal clumps of grey-green leaves. Gaillardia is native to North America and its common name, blanket flower, is said to have come from the central boss of the flower resembling the  colourful blankets woven by some Native Americans. Its botanical name is derived from the name of a patron of botany in the 18th century, Madame Gaillard de Charentonneau.

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How to grow gaillardia

Gaillardia 'Sun Burst'
Gaillardia ‘Sun Burst’

Grow gaillardia in a sunny border or large pot, in free-draining, low nutrient soil (there’s no need to add fertiliser). Once established, gaillardias are tolerant of drought. Both annual and perennial gaillardias are easy to grow from seed or you can buy perennial types as plants. Gaillardias need little care apart from deadheading to encourage more blooms and cutting back at the end of the season. Perennial gaillardias are hardy but may be short-lived, particularly in cold areas or after wet winters.

Growing gaillardia: jump links

  • Planting gaillardia
  • Caring for gaillardia
  • Propagating gaillardia
  • Growing gaillardia: problem-solving
  • Buying gaillardia
  • Best gaillardia to grow

  • Where to grow gaillardia

    Gaillardia × grandiflora 'Burgunder Hopleys'
    Gaillardia × grandiflora ‘Burgunder Hopleys’

    Grow gaillardia in a sunny spot in free-draining soil. On heavy ground such as clay, try growing gaillardia in raised beds, planting on small mounds of soil to prevent the rootball becoming saturated, or adding grit.


    How to plant

    Gaillardias perform best in low nutrient soil, as rich soil encourages lots of leafy growth at the expense of flowers. It’s therefore important not to add organic matter to the planting hole when planting gaillardia. Perennial gaillardias are best planted in spring so they can establish before summer droughts and winter cold. Space plants 30-60cm apart and keep watered until established. Harden off (gradually acclimatise to outside growing conditions) gaillardias grown from seed before planting out in late spring.


    How to care for gaillardia

    Gaillardia is easy to grow and requires little care. Deadhead spent flowers to encourage more to form, and then cut all stems back to the ground once flowering is over. Remember gaillardias do best in nutrient-poor soil so it’s best not to fertilise or mulch as you would with other perennials.


    How to propagate gaillardia

    Both annual and perennial gaillardias are easy to grow from seed. Perennials usually flower in their first year if seed is started off in early spring under cover. Sow perennial seed thinly in pots or trays of seed compost with added perlite to increase drainage. Transplant into individual pots to grow on and plant out when sufficiently large. Annual gaillardias can be sown in modular trays for easy transplanting or in the soil directly where they are to bloom.

    Take root cuttings of perennial gaillardias in late-winter to early spring.


    Growing gaillardia: problem solving

    Given the right growing conditions, gaillardia is a trouble-free plant. In very dry summers, powdery mildew may appear on the leaves and stems, which may then die back. Cut off and bin affected material to restrict the spread of this disease.
    Slugs can damage newly emerged growth and seedlings.

    Advice on buying gaillardia

    • A wide range of gaillardias is available to buy from garden centres and nurseries. Look for seed, potted plants in a range of sizes, and plug plants
    • Bear in mind that you may find more choice at specialist retailers

    Where to buy gaillardia

    Gaillardia varieties to grow

    Gaillardia x grandiflora 'Arizona Apricot'
    Gaillardia x grandiflora ‘Arizona Apricot’

    Gaillardia ‘Mesa Bright Bicolour’ – long flowering season, with bright orange-yellow blooms with red centres.

    Height x Spread: 60cm x 45cm

    Gaillardia aristata ‘Goblin’ – Beautiful yellow-tipped red flowers with a large red central cone.

    H x S: 30cm x 45cm

    Gaillardia x grandiflora ‘Arizona Apricot’ – sward variety with yellow flowers blushed with apricot.

    H x S: 30cm x 45cm

    Gaillardia aristata ‘Burgundy’ – large, wine-red flowers in tall stems.

    H x S: 60cm x 45cm

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