How to grow sedum

How to grow sedums

Find out how to grow sedums, in our detailed Grow guide.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Plant
Plant

Do not Plant in January

Do not Plant in February

Do not Plant in March

Do not Plant in April

Do Plant in May

Do Plant in June

Do not Plant in July

Do not Plant in August

Do not Plant in September

Do not Plant in October

Do not Plant in November

Do not Plant in December

Flowers
Flowers

Plant does not flower in January

Plant does not flower in February

Plant does not flower in March

Plant does not flower in April

Plant does not flower in May

Plant does flower in June

Plant does flower in July

Plant does flower in August

Plant does not flower in September

Plant does not flower in October

Plant does not flower in November

Plant does not flower in December

Take cuttings
Take cuttings

Do not Take cuttings in January

Do not Take cuttings in February

Do not Take cuttings in March

Do not Take cuttings in April

Do not Take cuttings in May

Do not Take cuttings in June

Do not Take cuttings in July

Do not Take cuttings in August

Do Take cuttings in September

Do Take cuttings in October

Do Take cuttings in November

Do not Take cuttings in December

Sedum is a genus also known as stonecrop. This usually refers to the small, fleshy-leaved succulents that spread like a mat and originate in dry, rocky locations so they’re very drought tolerant. The Sedum genus used to also include other types of stonecrop or ice plants that have been reclassified as Hylotelephium. As well as the attractive sculptural features of the evergreen foliage, sedums produce small nectar-rich flowers that attract pollinating insects. They make good ground cover outdoors, particularly on green roofs, and are sometimes used as an alternative to grass lawns. The tender varieties make good houseplants and can also be grown outside in containers in summer.

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Planting position

How to grow sedums - sedum as a green roof
How to grow sedums – sedum as a green roof

Sedums need well-drained soil and a sheltered, very sunny site to thrive. A terracotta container or window box would work well, or a roof with a small depth of growing medium.


Planting technique

How to grow sedums - planting sedums in pots
How to grow sedums – planting sedums in pots

Add plenty of grit to the planting hole to ensure good drainage.


Propagation

Sedums can be propagated by cuttings or offsets from the main plant. Each leaf can grow into a new plant if gently pulled away and replanted.


Troubleshooting

Sedums are relatively pest-free. The main enemy is cold, wet weather, so make sure tender plants are protected over winter.


Care

Sedums need very little pruning or aftercare. Do not water over winter.

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Sedum varieties to try

Sedum reflexum is a hardy species native to the UK and Europe. It’s fast-growing and makes good ground cover with evergreen foliage and nectar-rich, yellow flowers in summer that attract pollinating insects. Combine with sempervivums and other hardy sedums.
Sedum dasyphyllum or Corsican stonecrop, grows in hot, dry conditions. Star-shaped flowers appear in early summer and the leaves turn purple in winter. Ideal for growing between stepping stones, on green roofs or in the crevices of dry walls, it can also be used as a lawn substitute in the right conditions.
Sedum spathulifolium ‘Cape Blanco’ has distinctive foliage that comes into its own in winter with small yellow flowers in summer. In colder regions, it needs protection from winter frosts. The Royal Horticultural Society has given it its prestigious Award of Garden Merit (AGM).
Sedum morganianum ‘Burrito’, or donkey’s tail, has tails of trailing succulent leaves and pink, star-shaped flowers in summer. A tender sedum, it’s usually grown as a houseplant on a windowsill out of direct sunlight. It can be moved outside in summer.