Earwig trap

How to make earwig traps

Earwigs nibbling your plants? Find out how to create a harmless earwig trap so you can move them.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
At its best
At its best

Plant is not at its best in January

Plant is not at its best in February

Plant is not at its best in March

Plant is at its best in April

Plant is at its best in May

Plant is at its best in June

Plant is at its best in July

Plant is at its best in August

Plant is at its best in September

Plant is not at its best in October

Plant is not at its best in November

Plant is not at its best in December

To do
To do

Do To do in January

Do To do in February

Do To do in March

Do To do in April

Do To do in May

Do To do in June

Do To do in July

Do To do in August

Do To do in September

Do To do in October

Do To do in November

Do To do in December

While they are great aphid eaters, earwigs also devour young shoots and in midsummer will feed on the petals of your prize blooms, especially dahlias.

A simple straw trap, made from a plastic pot and placed on top of a cane, allows you to collect them and move them elsewhere. You can also use this method to attract earwigs to plants that you’d like them to remain on. 

Discover how to make earwig traps in just three steps, below.

While they are great aphid eaters, earwigs they also devour young shoots.

You will need

String or twine

Cane

Plastic pot

Straw

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Total time:

Step 1

Wind some string around the upper part of the cane a few times to stop the pot slipping down once it’s balanced on top.

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Step 2

Earwigs like a bit of moisture, so stuff the pot with plenty of dampened straw, and fill it well to stop it all falling out.

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Step 3

Place the cane in your border. Press the pot upside down over the cane at a similar height to the flowers you want to protect.

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