Phalaenopsis orchid

How to repot a moth orchid

Find out how to repot a moth orchid with the help of our step-by-step guide.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
At its best
At its best

Plant is at its best in January

Plant is at its best in February

Plant is at its best in March

Plant is at its best in April

Plant is at its best in May

Plant is at its best in June

Plant is at its best in July

Plant is at its best in August

Plant is at its best in September

Plant is at its best in October

Plant is at its best in November

Plant is at its best in December

To do
To do

Do To do in January

Do To do in February

Do To do in March

Do To do in April

Do To do in May

Do To do in June

Do To do in July

Do To do in August

Do To do in September

Do To do in October

Do To do in November

Do To do in December

Orchids have acquired an undeserved reputation for being fussy and difficult to grow. This certainly isn’t the case with moth orchids (Phalaenopsis). Though native to tropical jungles where they grow high up in trees, they make rewarding house plants that can flower year round in the average home.

Watch Alan Titchmarsh’s video guide to looking after orchids.

Moth orchids should only need repotting when they are about to burst out of their current pot. Choose a transparent pot, which permits the roots to photosynthesise.

Find out how to repot your moth orchid, below.

Moth orchids should only need repotting when they are about to burst out of their current pot.

You will need

  • Moth orchid (Phalaenopsis)
  • Secateurs
  • Transparent orchid pot
  • Orchid compost
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Total time:

Step 1

After flowering is over, wait several weeks before cutting back the flower spike. When a green bud forms lower down, cut the stalk off just above it.

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Step 2

Moth orchids can be repotted at any time of year. Soak the compost thoroughly and then tip the plant carefully out of the pot without breaking up the ball of the roots.

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Step 3

Use a clear plastic pot a size larger than the original, and special orchid compost. Put a little in the base, sit the plant inside and fill the gap around the edge.

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Step 4

Most of the aerial roots should be coiled inside the new pot, but any that are too long or badly placed are best cut off cleanly to leave the plant looking tidy.

trimming-off-stray-aerial-roots-from-a-moth-orchid-2
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