How to take lavender cuttings

How to take lavender cuttings

Find out how to boost stocks of lavender for free, by taking cuttings in summer - just follow this step-by-step guide.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
At its best
At its best

Plant is not at its best in January

Plant is not at its best in February

Plant is not at its best in March

Plant is not at its best in April

Plant is not at its best in May

Plant is not at its best in June

Plant is at its best in July

Plant is not at its best in August

Plant is not at its best in September

Plant is not at its best in October

Plant is not at its best in November

Plant is not at its best in December

To do
To do

Do not To do in January

Do not To do in February

Do not To do in March

Do not To do in April

Do not To do in May

Do To do in June

Do To do in July

Do To do in August

Do To do in September

Do not To do in October

Do not To do in November

Do not To do in December

If you’re new to plant propagation, taking lavender cuttings in summer is a good way to start as they root easily and will provide you with lots of new plants for free.

Choose non-flowered shoots of this year’s growth and ensure that they’re free from pests and disease. 

You can also take summer cuttings of many other plants, including rosemary, roses and penstemons

Follow our simple step-by-step guide below to get more fragrant lavender plants, for free.

If you're new to plant propagation, taking lavender cuttings in summer is a good way to start. 

You will need

  • Lavender plant
  • Sharp knife
  • 10cm pot
  • Multi-purpose compost
  • Rooting hormone (liquid or powder)
  • Clear polythene bags
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Total time:

Step 1

Choose sideshoots as cuttings, pulling these away from the main stem with a thin strip of bark, or heel, still attached.

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Step 2

This heel is important as it is where the roots of the new plant will develop. Trim off the small flap of excess bark with a knife.

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Step 3

Remove the lower pairs of leaves so that the cutting has a length of bare stem that can be cleanly inserted into the compost.

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Step 4

Dip the cut end of each cutting into rooting hormone. Insert several cuttings around the edge of small pots of gritty compost.

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Step 5

Water the compost well then cover the whole pot with a clear polythene bag to maintain a humid atmosphere around the cuttings.

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Step 6

Put the pots in a warm, shaded place. Once rooting has started (usually after four to six weeks), cut the corner of the bag to increase ventilation. Remove the bag completely after a few weeks. Leave cuttings in place until they are well rooted, then pot up individually.

Feeling inspired? Take a look at five other ways to increase your stock of plants through propagation, or browse our propagation projects.

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Grow plants on

Grow plants to a larger size before planting out in their final positions – pot up each cutting individually. Protect cuttings under glass or a cold frame in winter and plant out the following spring.

Coldframe