Anemone 'Wild Swan'

How to grow Japanese anemones

Find out all you need to know about growing Japanese anemones in this Grow Guide.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Plant
Plant

Do not Plant in January

Do not Plant in February

Do not Plant in March

Do not Plant in April

Do Plant in May

Do Plant in June

Do Plant in July

Do Plant in August

Do Plant in September

Do not Plant in October

Do not Plant in November

Do not Plant in December

Flowers
Flowers

Plant does not flower in January

Plant does not flower in February

Plant does not flower in March

Plant does not flower in April

Plant does not flower in May

Plant does not flower in June

Plant does not flower in July

Plant does not flower in August

Plant does flower in September

Plant does flower in October

Plant does not flower in November

Plant does not flower in December

Cut back
Cut back

Do not Cut back in January

Do not Cut back in February

Do Cut back in March

Do not Cut back in April

Do not Cut back in May

Do not Cut back in June

Do not Cut back in July

Do not Cut back in August

Do not Cut back in September

Do not Cut back in October

Do Cut back in November

Do not Cut back in December

Japanese anemones put on a stunning show in late summer and early autumn. Open blooms in pale pink or white float on tall stems accompanied by attractive foliage.

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They make an ideal choice for growing in woodland locations or beneath trees. A drift of these graceful perennials is guaranteed to brighten up a shady spot and they can be grown in containers or mixed borders.

Take a look at our handy Japanese anemones Grow Guide, below.

Japanese anemones put on a stunning show in late summer and early autumn. Open blooms in pale pink or white float on tall stems.

Anemone hupensis var. japonica Pamina
Anemone hupensis var. japonica Pamina

Where to plant Japanese anemones

For best results plant in moist but well-drained soil in light shade.

White Japanese anemone
White Japanese anemone

How to plant Japanese anemones

Dig a generous hole and add some well rotted manure or leafmould. Water in well and apply a thick mulch.

Anemone hupehensis 'Splendens'
Anemone hupehensis ‘Splendens’

Looking after Japanese anemones

Japanese anemones will grow in most soil types, but do not like really wet winters. A generous mulch in spring and autumn will help to protect the plant. These plants do tend to spread, so larger clumps will need lifting and dividing every few years. Do this in autumn or spring  – you may find plants sulk when moved, but they should settle and re-establish themselves in a couple of years. After flowering, cut back stalks and tidy old leaves in March.

Taking root cuttings from a Japanese anemone
Taking root cuttings from a Japanese anemone

Propagation of Japanese anemones

To propagate, divide clumps of Japanese anemones in early spring or autumn. When dividing plants in autumn, you can also take root cuttings. Watch Carol Klein’s tips on propagating Japanese anemones from root cuttings.

Japanese anemones: problem solving

Japanese anemones do not suffer from any particular pests and diseases.

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Anemone hupensis var. japonica Pamina
Anemone hupensis var. japonica Pamina

Japanese anemones to try

  • Anemone x hybrida ‘Honorine Jobert’ – a classic Japanese anemone, with white, single flowers, tinged with pink on the underside of the petals. It’s perfect for brightening up a shady corner either in a large container or herbaceous border.
  • Anemone hupehensis ‘Splendens’ – with pink flowers, this more compact variety, is a good choice for growing in containers or at the front of a sunny border.
  • Anemone ‘Tiki sensation’ – an unusual new Japanese anemone with, blousy double flowers that change in colour from blush pink to white.
  • Anemone hupehensis var. japonica ‘Pamina’ –  large, double, deep pink, cup-shaped flowers appear in July and August. These suit the middle of a partially shady border, but will grow in sun.
  • Anemone rupicola ‘Wild Swan’ –  pictured at the top of the page. A relatively new discovery believed to be a cross between early and late flowering anemones, so it is not a true Japanese anemone. It’s unusual in flowering intermittently from May to November. Each flower petal has a distinct grey-blue streak on the underside, so when in bud or half closed, they look bluish, but are pure white on opening.

Japanese anemones put on a stunning show in late summer and early autumn. Open blooms in pale pink or white float on tall stems accompanied by attractive foliage.

They make an ideal choice for growing in woodland locations or beneath trees. A drift of these graceful perennials is guaranteed to brighten up a shady spot and they can be grown in containers or mixed borders.

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