Mistletoe and sea holly Christmas wreath

Mistletoe and teasel Christmas wreath

Discover how to make a Christmas wreath using a variety of plants gathered from the garden – with a dash of colour added.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
At its best
At its best

Plant is not at its best in January

Plant is not at its best in February

Plant is not at its best in March

Plant is not at its best in April

Plant is not at its best in May

Plant is not at its best in June

Plant is not at its best in July

Plant is not at its best in August

Plant is not at its best in September

Plant is not at its best in October

Plant is not at its best in November

Plant is at its best in December

To do
To do

Do not To do in January

Do not To do in February

Do not To do in March

Do not To do in April

Do not To do in May

Do not To do in June

Do not To do in July

Do not To do in August

Do not To do in September

Do not To do in October

Do not To do in November

Do To do in December

This unusual Christmas wreath should encourage you to get outside and forage. Experiment with seedheads, fir cones, hips and berries, and garnish with dried flowerheads. Mistletoe can be found growing wild, but is sold at florists and markets during the Christmas season.

Nature can provide lots of colour at this time of year, but reach for the spray can for a helping hand – we used a blue acrylic paint.

More Christmas makes:

Here’s how to make this pretty wreath.

Nature can provide lots of colour at this time of year, but reach for the spray can for a helping hand.
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You Will Need

  • Fine florists' wire
  • Vine stems or other woody stems
  • Lichen-covered twigs
  • Rosehips, mistletoe, catkins
  • Variegated ivy
  • Dried eryngium flowerheads
  • Fir cones and seedheads
  • Allium and teasel seedheads (we sprayed ours blue using an acrylic craft paint)

Total time:

Step 1

Soak the woody stems in water beforehand – this will make them easier to bend without splitting. Form each stem into a hoop, then wire together.

Forming the stems into hoops
Forming the stems into hoops

Step 2

Attaching the seedheads and hips with wire
Attaching the seedheads and hips with wire

Add your foraged garden finds, mixing foliage, berries and seedheads. Thread them through the twigs and attach each one securely with florists’ wire. Aim to allow the natural structure of the wreath to show through.

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Cut a generous length of stem

Keeping a length of stem on foraged hips, seedheads and berries means it will be easier attach them to the twiggy hoop.

Secateurs