Morning glory pot display

Morning glory pot display

Find out how to grow morning glory in a pot.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
At its best
At its best

Plant is not at its best in January

Plant is not at its best in February

Plant is not at its best in March

Plant is not at its best in April

Plant is not at its best in May

Plant is at its best in June

Plant is at its best in July

Plant is at its best in August

Plant is not at its best in September

Plant is not at its best in October

Plant is not at its best in November

Plant is not at its best in December

To do
To do

Do not To do in January

Do not To do in February

Do not To do in March

Do not To do in April

Do To do in May

Do To do in June

Do not To do in July

Do not To do in August

Do not To do in September

Do not To do in October

Do not To do in November

Do not To do in December

Each blue or magenta flower of ipomoea, the morning glory, lasts just one day, but it blooms reliably throughout the summer. The dense mat of heart-shaped leaves provide a perfect backdrop for the cheery flowers.

How to grow annual climbers from seed

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You Will Need

  • Ipomoea 'Purple Haze' (4)
  • 48cm urn or similar sized pot
  • Willow plant support
  • Multi-purpose, peat-free compost

Step 1

Adding compost
Adding compost

Add crocks to the base of the container to aid drainage, then fill two-thirds with compost.

Step 2

Planting the morning glory
Planting the morning glory

Position the plants 15cm apart and firm the compost around them, removing air pockets. Place the willow support carefully over the climbers. Push the legs firmly into the compost, ensuring the structure is even by checking the support’s bands are horizontal. Water the plants thoroughly.

Step 3

Adding fertiliser
Adding fertiliser

As the plants begin to flower, feed them weekly with a potash-rich feed such as tomato feed, to boost flowering potential.

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Kevin Smith says…

Combine varieties of different colours to create a display full of interest – one’s as easy to grow as the next, so there’s no reason to stick to one type. Start early in the year if you’re sowing morning glory from seed.

Kevin Smith