Euphorbia trigona f. rubra at the rear

Stylish succulent container display

Learn how to plant up a container with a mix of attractive succulents.

Planted up with an interesting blend of succulents, this container display is ideal for a sunny spot in the garden where these plants should thrive. This succulent container display is finished with a washed gravel mulch that complements the foliage colours and aids drainage.

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More container gardening advice:

Find out how we planted up this succulent container display and how to care for it, below.


The plants we used

Bonsai crassula, Crassula sarcocaulis

Planting Crassula sarcocaulis
Planting Crassula sarcocaulis

Commonly known as the bonsai crassula, Crassula sarcocaulis is one of the hardier succulents, and can tolerate light frosts. It’s called the bonsai crassula because it has an attractive, branching form. In its place you could also try Crassula orbicularis or Crassula tetragona.


Echeveria ‘Perle Von Nürnberg’

Planting echeveria ‘Perle Von Nürnberg’
Planting echeveria ‘Perle Von Nürnberg’

‘Perle Von Nürnberg’ is a lovely echeveria with glaucous, pale-purple leaves. It develops the best colour in full sun and in time should produce lovely coral pink flowers. Other echeverias would work, too, including Echeveria setosa and Echeveria colorata.


Euphorbia trigona f. rubra

Euphorbia trigona f. rubra at the rear
Euphorbia trigona f. rubra at the rear

The African milk tree, Euphorbia trigona is a popular succulent houseplant. Euphorbia trigona f. rubra is an attractive form with red-tinged leaves and stems. Take care when handling this plant and avoid touching the white sap, as this can irritate the skin. Alternatives include Euphorbia tirucalli and Crassula ‘Gollum’.


Care and maintenance

Once you have planted you pot, place it a sunny area of the garden. Ensure the container doesn’t become waterlogged, as this can cause the plants to rot. The gravel mulch is both decorative and helps to ensure water doesn’t splash on to the plants, which would make them more likely to rot.

Water this container no more than once a week and avoid watering if the compost feels moist.

Being only frost hardy, these plants are not suitable for keeping outside over winter, so you’ll need to find a frost-free spot to keep them over winter. You can move the outdoors again after all risk of frost has passed, in early summer. Alternatively, keep the pot on a sunny windowsill all year round.

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Planted at any time of year, this container will look good for a few years. At some point you’ll need to think about giving each succulent more space to grow – each can be repotted separately into gritty compost.