Putting the honeysuckle cuttings into terracotta pots

How to take cuttings from honeysuckle

Bring more scent to your garden by taking cuttings from your honeysuckle plants.

By taking summer honeysuckle cuttings, you can boost your stock of plants and clothe your walls and fences with deliciously fragrant, wildlife-friendly blooms.

Aim to take these cuttings in July and August, when the wood of the stems is flexible but firm – also known as ‘semi-ripe’.

The best time to collect your cutting material is first thing in the morning. Look for short lateral stems, or pieces of stem that are still flexible. The long extension growths that many climbers produce are best avoided – they’re too soft and unsuitable for cuttings, as they can’t hold enough moisture, so are more likely to wilt and fail.

Once you’ve potted your cuttings, ensure they’re kept in warm conditions but out of direct sun. Keep the compost damp and spray the cuttings with water frequently to reduce transpiration (water loss).

Pot up the cuttings individually when you see roots poking out the bottom of the pot. When they’re well-rooted, ease them out and grown on in re-used pots.

More expert advice on taking cuttings from garden plants:

Follow the easy steps in this guide to taking summer cuttings from honeysuckle.

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You Will Need

  • Secateurs or a sharp knife
  • Soil-based potting compost
  • Coarse sand or perlite
  • Horticultural grit

Step 1

Selecting the stems for cuttings
Selecting the stems for cuttings

Look for slightly older wood, which will make excellent material for cuttings – lateral shoots (sideshoots) are usually ideal. Cut long pieces so you can make several cuttings from each one.

Step 2

Cutting the stems to short lengths
Cutting the stems to short lengths

Cut the sideshoot into pieces with three or four leaf joints. Cut underneath a leaf joint and just above one, slicing cleanly and removing lower leaves to prevent rotting.

Step 3

Putting the honeysuckle cuttings into terracotta pots
Putting the honeysuckle cuttings into terracotta pots

Gently push down the cuttings around the side of a pot of gritty compost, so the lowest leaves are at the surface of the compost. Make sure they don’t touch each other.

Step 4

Covering the compost with fine grit
Covering the compost with fine grit

Cover the surface of the pot with fine grit to help drainage and prevent stems rotting, suppress weeds and retain moisture. Water well and place in a bright position, out of direct sunlight.

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