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Bay leaf suckers

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Time to act
Time to act

Do not Time to act in January

Do not Time to act in February

Do not Time to act in March

Do Time to act in April

Do Time to act in May

Do not Time to act in June

Do not Time to act in July

Do not Time to act in August

Do not Time to act in September

Do not Time to act in October

Do not Time to act in November

Do not Time to act in December

In mid-spring, 2mm-long, greenish-brown, adult bay suckers emerge from overwintering. They feed on young bay leaves, turning them yellow and making the edges thicken and curl. The females then lay eggs under the curling edges and the new, young grey insects – which have a fluffy white covering – carry on feeding on the sap, prolonging the problem. Prolific breeding in summer means the symptoms don’t disappear.

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Symptoms

Young, winged, sap-feeding insects attack young bay foliage, discolouring and distorting it.

Find it on

bay leaves

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Organic

Minor attacks can be tackled by promptly removing all affected leaves. Also, destroy any that fall on the ground, as these can still carry the eggs or adults.