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Codling moth

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Time to act
Time to act

Do not Time to act in January

Do not Time to act in February

Do Time to act in March

Do Time to act in April

Do Time to act in May

Do Time to act in June

Do Time to act in July

Do Time to act in August

Do not Time to act in September

Do not Time to act in October

Do not Time to act in November

Do not Time to act in December

The adult codling moths lay their eggs on or near developing fruit. These eggs hatch into small white caterpillars, which eat their way into the fruit and feed inside while it’s developing. The caterpillars may be found inside the fruit at harvest time, but have usually eaten their way out to overwinter on the bark of the tree. They will then pupate and hatch into adult moths the following spring, ready to mate.

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Symptoms

Holes often visible in ripe fruit. When the fruit is cut open, the tunnel made by the maggot-like caterpillar will be seen, lined with its droppings or frass.

Find it on

apples, pears, quince, walnuts

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Organic

Remove infected fruit as soon as any damage is evident to limit overwintering caterpillars. Control is available in the form of pheromone traps that catch male moths in April and May.