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Currant blister aphids

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Time to act
Time to act

Do Time to act in January

Do not Time to act in February

Do Time to act in March

Do Time to act in April

Do Time to act in May

Do not Time to act in June

Do not Time to act in July

Do not Time to act in August

Do not Time to act in September

Do not Time to act in October

Do not Time to act in November

Do Time to act in December

Sap-sucking aphids are problematic for currant bushes. In spring, they cause the foliage to become blistered and puckered, as well as discolouring areas, leaving yellowish-green or red patches. The aphids then fly to hedge woundwort, a wildflower, for the rest of the summer, but return to the currants in autumn to lay their eggs. Since the currant crop isn’t affected, action isn’t essential.

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Symptoms

Sap-sucking aphids cause the leaves of currant bushes to become distorted, with raised, puckered areas and patches of yellow-green or red.

Find it on

blackcurrants, redcurrants, whitecurrants

Organic

If the symptoms were evident last summer, in winter get rid of the eggs by spraying plants with an enzyme wash, which will quickly dissolve them.

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Chemical

In spring, spray plants with the systemic insecticide pyrethrum to kill the emerging aphids. Don’t wait for the symptoms to appear, as there’s no point in spraying once the leaves have become puckered.