66478

Leafhopper

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Time to act
Time to act

Do not Time to act in January

Do not Time to act in February

Do Time to act in March

Do Time to act in April

Do Time to act in May

Do Time to act in June

Do Time to act in July

Do Time to act in August

Do not Time to act in September

Do not Time to act in October

Do not Time to act in November

Do not Time to act in December

Adult and immature leafhoppers suck sap from the leaves of plants and cause mottled discolouration. The 3mm-long adults readily spring from the leaves when disturbed. The pest usually overwinters as eggs laid on the plant. These hatch in spring and go on to produce several generations of the pest in a single season. Individual leafhopper species are specific to particular plants or groups of plants. Although most plants are able to survive an attack, leafhopper feeding leaves unsightly marks on foliage.

Advertisement

Symptoms

Yellow to white mottling of upper surface of leaves. Whole leaf may become puckered and turn brown at the edges.

Find it on

a range of ornamental plants, trees, shrubs, herbs, some vegetables, fruit

Advertisement

Organic

Cover a piece of stiff card with grease or contact adhesive and hold it above the infected plants while lightly brushing the foliage with your other hand. The disturbed leafhoppers should become stuck to the card and can then be disposed of. Alternatively, spray with organic pesticides based on pyrethrum in spring and summer.