Gladiolus communis subsp. byzantinus

How to grow gladioli

Find out all you need to know about growing gladioli, in this detailed Grow Guide.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Plant
Plant

Do not Plant in January

Do not Plant in February

Do Plant in March

Do Plant in April

Do not Plant in May

Do not Plant in June

Do not Plant in July

Do not Plant in August

Do not Plant in September

Do not Plant in October

Do not Plant in November

Do not Plant in December

Flowers
Flowers

Plant does not flower in January

Plant does not flower in February

Plant does not flower in March

Plant does not flower in April

Plant does flower in May

Plant does flower in June

Plant does flower in July

Plant does flower in August

Plant does not flower in September

Plant does not flower in October

Plant does not flower in November

Plant does not flower in December

Cut back
Cut back

Do not Cut back in January

Do not Cut back in February

Do not Cut back in March

Do not Cut back in April

Do not Cut back in May

Do not Cut back in June

Do not Cut back in July

Do not Cut back in August

Do Cut back in September

Do not Cut back in October

Do not Cut back in November

Do not Cut back in December

Gladioli are often known as sword lillies due to their long, pointed leaves. The distinctive tall flower spikes emerge in summer and come in a whole host of colours. Although they have suffered from an unfashionable reputation, despite being popular props for musicians and performers, they are sneaking back into favour. It’s not hard to figure out why, as they’re perfect for bringing colour to a sunny herbaceous border, providing good contrast with grasses and other flowering plants. They also look good in containers and make excellent cut flowers.

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