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How to grow pak choi

Pak choi is easy to grow and a great shade crop. Find out how to sow it in this step-by-step guide.

A table displaying which months are best to sow, plant and harvest.
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
At its best
At its best

Plant is not at its best in January

Plant is not at its best in February

Plant is not at its best in March

Plant is not at its best in April

Plant is not at its best in May

Plant is not at its best in June

Plant is not at its best in July

Plant is at its best in August

Plant is not at its best in September

Plant is not at its best in October

Plant is not at its best in November

Plant is not at its best in December

To do
To do

Do not To do in January

Do not To do in February

Do not To do in March

Do not To do in April

Do not To do in May

Do To do in June

Do To do in July

Do To do in August

Do not To do in September

Do not To do in October

Do not To do in November

Do not To do in December

Pak choi is a versatile leafy crop, bearing tasty, low-maintenance leaves that can be used in salads or stir fries. Harvest the young leaves on a cut-and-come-again basis to add colour to salads, or harvest the mature head to use in stir fries.

Try our pak choi, kale and asparagus pea pot.

Pak choi is easy to grow, but can be prone to bolting in hot weather so it’s a good idea to grow it in partial shade and keep it well watered. Pak choi is hardier than many other leafy crops, so late sowings will crop in autumn and even winter, if given a little protection with a cloche or some fleece.

You will need

  • Pak choi seeds
  • Small pots or cells
  • Seed compost
  • Fleece
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Step 1

Sow seed in moist compost in small pots or cells. You can also sow direct in the ground, but seedlings can be devoured by slugs. Thin out young seedlings to two per pot and keep them well watered.

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Step 2

When seedlings are 5cm tall, plant them out into a moisture-retentive soil, firming in well. Water the newly transplanted plants and keep them well watered to prevent bolting. Cover the crop with horticultural fleece to provide a barrier to airborne pests, such as flea beetles.

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Step 3

You can harvest the young leaves after 30 days, to add to salads. From 45 days, the plants should have developed a ‘heart’ and be ready to harvest for stir fries. Pak choi is most succulent and has the best flavour when eaten fresh from the plot, so only harvest what you need, when you need it.

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